The Architect's Newspaper

The Architect's Newspaper
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The Architect's Newspaper

 •  August 31, 2015

SXSW Eco’s Place by Design (PxD) competition recently announced an ambitious list of finalist projects. Each design represents the competition’s belief in the impact of quality design and the utilization of space to develop the interactive relationship between people and place. THE SWINGS BY MOUNA ANDRAOS AND MELISSA MONGIAT (COURTESY PLACE BY ...

The Architect's Newspaper

 •  August 28, 2015

Green roofs these days are the new blacktops. And just when you thought they couldn’t get any bigger, there are now plans to build a 30-acre park blanketing a mixed-use, $3 billion development inCupertino, California. Right now, the site is the dying Vallco Shopping Mall. (COURTESY SAN HILL PROPERTY CO.) Developers Sand Hill Property bought the ...

The Architect's Newspaper

 •  August 23, 2015

On Friday, the gates opened at a long-awaited, $10 million park in Greenwich Village. The 16,000-square-foot, triangular-shaped space was designed by Rick Parisi of M. Paul Friedberg & Partners and features hexagonal pavers, benches, colorful water jets, an array of tree and flower species, and an amorphous lawn at its center. (COURTESY JACKIE ...

The Architect's Newspaper

 •  August 18, 2015

The Architect’s Newspaper first Best Of Products program drew nearly 400 entries, representing all categories of design and construction products. Here is a selection of the finalists from the juried competition. Gyptone BIG Curve CertainTeed Ceilings These perforated acoustical gypsum panels can be formed into highly curved ceilings without the ...

The Architect's Newspaper

 •  August 17, 2015

What appears to be an explosive invasion of tiny black orbs is actually one small part of the solution to Los Angeles’ four-year drought. Colloquially called “shade balls,” these 36 cent buoyant spheres are a part of a $34.5 million water quality protection project by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP). The department deployed ...

The Architect's Newspaper

 •  August 12, 2015

As thousands of architecture students prepare to head back to school, August marks yet another step toward an easier path to licensure for aspiring architects. NCARB recently accepted proposals from over a dozen accredited architecture schools implementing a more “integrated path to licensure within academic programs accredited by the NAAB.” The ...

The Architect's Newspaper

 •  August 4, 2015

A biophysicist at Columbia University has discovered how to tap evaporating water as an electrical energy source using a simple device made from bacterial spores, glue, and LEGO bricks. Ozgur Sahin’s findings operate at the cellular level, based around his research on the Bacillus bacteria, a microorganism commonly found in soil—and its ...

The Architect's Newspaper

 •  August 3, 2015

California – and much of the Western United States – is currently in the midst of a severe and unprecedented water crisis. In a recent op-ed for the Los Angeles Times, Jay Famiglietti, a senior water scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, laid out the dire situation in California, brought on by historic drought and depleting water supplies ...

The Architect's Newspaper

 •  July 27, 2015

Building America’s largest private real estate development in history would be a tricky proposition whether or not it was taking shape over an active rail yard in the middle of the densest city in the country. But, of course, that is exactly where Hudson Yards—the mega development with those superlative bragging rights—is taking shape. (COURTESY ...

The Architect's Newspaper

 •  July 27, 2015

On a hot day in June, a jury convened to review nearly 400 entries to The Architect’s Newspaper first Best of Products competition. Submissions, divided over eight categories, abounded in new materials and exciting technologies, provoking a lively dialogue during the evaluation process. Colin Brice of Mapos, Barry Goralnick of Barry Goralnick ...