Deeproot Green Infrastructure

Deeproot Green Infrastructure
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DeepRoot Green Infrastructure is a leading urban landscape products and ecosystem services supplier committed to enhancing the built environment with innovative and quality products. We believe in using "green utilities" like soil, trees and stormwater as tools to solve the environmental challenges that face us and to prioritize the health and longevity of our shared urban habitat.   DeepRoot was founded in 1976 with the introduction of DeepRoot root barriers. All of our products that help trees survive in the urban environment, including the Silva Cell, root barriers, geomembranes, and ArborTie ® staking and guying material. 

Winter is upon us, and with it comes snow in many parts of the country. After a decent snowfall the plows come out, and inadvertently begin to illustrate compelling ideas for both traffic calming and public space. Yes, you read that correctly! As plows clear the streets and ensure automotive traffic can get around safely, they often leave some...

Mark Johnston is an independent scholar who holds a PhD in urban forestry from the University of Ulster. He has over forty years experience in the greenspace industry, including working as a tree officer in local government, consultant in private practice, university lecturer, and government adviser. Although originally from London, Mark is based...

Deeproot Green Infrastructure

 •  December 11, 2017

In early 2016, Fayetteville, a city in the Coastal Plain region of North Carolina, began construction on its first green street. The $1.2 million project, born out of partnership between the City of Fayetteville and North Carolina State University’s Department of Biological and Agricultural Engineering, was funded in part by a grant from the Clean...

Deeproot Green Infrastructure

 •  December 4, 2017

In dense urban areas, implementing stormwater management systems large enough to support healthy trees can be challenging given the multitude of street uses and the high volume of pedestrian, bicycle, and vehicle traffic. One option for providing stormwater control without impacting competing surface needs is using a suspended pavement system like...

Deeproot Green Infrastructure

 •  November 27, 2017

In Part One of this blog we set the stage to select quality trees by starting with a good specification, working within the normal project submittal process, and resetting our expectation of what constitutes a good quality tree. The requirements for inspecting the parts of the tree aboveground were reviewed. For the inspection of the parts of the...

Deeproot Green Infrastructure

 •  November 20, 2017

Many trees purchased from nurseries may have significant defects that can reduce the useful life of the tree. This isn’t just speculation; there is good evidence that large segments of the nursery industry are supplying defective plants. Brian Kane at the Urban Tree Foundation and Ed Gilman at the University of Florida, both respected researchers...

Deeproot Green Infrastructure

 •  November 13, 2017

When I signed up to helped design and build a parklet for this year’s PARK(ing) Day event with my local American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) chapter, I knew it would be a lot of work – but had no idea just how intense the dozens of hours of work designing and then installing it would be. 4:30am wake up? Check. 200 plant pots? Check....

Deeproot Green Infrastructure

 •  November 6, 2017

Today’s workplaces are a notable departure from those of the cubicle-filled past. With a better understanding of how design affects the mind, forward-thinking companies have rethought florescent lights, desk partitions, and separate departments, opting for natural light and flexible work zones to support creativity, focus, and teamwork. As...

Deeproot Green Infrastructure

 •  October 31, 2017

Have you ever had someone step on your foot? It hurts, right? Your foot has lots of little bones that are sensitive just like a tree has roots. Cities are considering ways to protect those tree roots and allow space for seasonal plantings that add vibrancy to downtown and mixed-use areas. There are a variety of products and methods that have been...

Deeproot Green Infrastructure

 •  October 23, 2017

When an urban site is developed, existing mature trees are often removed to facilitate construction. After the building is up, “replacement” trees are often planted, depending on local ordinances. Will these trees actually make up for what is lost? Certainly not at first. Studies show that trees can take 26 to 40 years to become net carbon...